M is for moving

 

Ok, folks, now this is the post to let you know that this blog moves to a new house.

From now on all the new photos and posts, as well as all the old ones are available at ivanpilov.com.

If you are my subscriber or follower through WordPress Reader there should not be any problem receiving updates from the new address. At least so they say in the moving guide.

If you are new here I encourage you to check ivanpilov.com for more recent publications. The new website has the same subscription and follow options, so you can choose whether to receive updates via email or see them in the reader.

Thank you, everyone! I’m glad you stick with me on my photo journey through life and I hope you’ll continue doing so on my new website.

Cheers!

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This is my first time…

… I’ve developed a black and white film myself. Yay! This is one of the few good photos from these first 2 rolls of film. I’ll post some more later.

Not that anyone asked, but just for the record and those curious I’ll say a couple of words about my impressions.

  1. So, it really turned out not that scary and messy as it seemed. Especially now when all the chemicals are ready it’s only a matter of loading that tank with film.
  2. I’ve always loved that feeling of getting my rolls from the photo lab, dashing home longing to fire up the scanner asap. Well now I love it even more! And there is a new part to it: cheer and joy when you open the tank and take out the film and see it actually worked.
  3. My main challenge was not the right receipt or anything like that, no. It was the weather. I live in a desert and we’ve got some hot days at the  moment, so my main issue was to cool the chemicals.
  4. Note to myself for the next time: buy those spongy tongs (or wetting agent)! Though I tried to use a soft suede cloth to remove water drops there are still very visible stains, which don’t look good at all.
  5. I’ve read and watched many instructions on how to do it, but no one ever mentioned a problem when your film is longer than the spiral. I had no choice but cut those last frames off. So what’s the point of shooting past the 36 frames mark anyway?

Ok, I think it’s enough for now.

Developing film on your own is not a big deal of course for those who are deep into photography, but for me it is a big step. A bit forced but anyway. Now I can continue shooting film even living in the middle of nowhere.

I would really like to hear some stories about your first developing experience, tips on how to deal with those issues I mentioned above or just your thoughts on the photos.

 

 

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A beggar

 

A Beggar. Lubitel 166, Kodak T-Max 100

 

I’m not particularly fond of taking pictures of homeless and destitute people. When it comes to ethics in street photography this demographics is one of the most controversial topics. And one of the most popular to shoot as well. And as long as I don’t want to make any statement with my pictures I prefer not to opt for this quick-n-easy street scene. (Eric Kim has got a very good video about ethics in street photography)

But this photo is an exception. The building behind is the headquarters of one of the largest oil companies in Russia, so the opposition or contrast here is kinda obvious. Something along the line of poor-rich etc. When I saw this woman I thought “well, that’s just symbolic. Russia is one of the biggest oil countries in the world, and those companies earn billions of dollars, and almost every one of them belongs to the government at least partially. So how come there is no proper social care and help for these people?”

Another way of looking at this photo, considering the background, is that the woman begs the rich in that building for some money.

You can think of your own message as well, so I’m not going to go deep into the analysis. Just let me know what you think of this shot in the comments.

Big questions of street photography. Taking photos of people.

It’s amazing how diverse a thing can be. I mean, I can just have a look at my feed of favourites here and see street photography of all types and sorts.

And looking at those pictures I found myself going over some “opposing” points in the genre, and how I figured them out for myself in the beginning.

Like the approach to taking photos of people in the streets.

in-a-starbucks

I know many photographers prefer just to come up close and snap a portrait. I’ve seen some of them doing it in a rather aggressive way, to my liking. Like this:

There’s another way, which I followed, to be an unnoticed observer. This technique allows you to catch a more natural moment and not to destroy a story that might be unfolding. Also, it helps to avoid conflicts, of course, though some would definitely call this approach cowardly.

Olmp35DC_kodak_ultramax400_1091_web

Since I’ve got so many various street photographers following my blog, I’ve decided to ask you a question.

What is your approach to photographing people in the streets? Do you ask for permission or prefer to be unnoticed?

 

Looking for a source of inspiration

This post is about inspiration.

When I just started my way into street photography, I didn’t figure out what exactly I want to shoot right from the beginning. As I had never done this before, I was confused, but I realised that this genre is what I enjoy the most.

So, I needed some guidance to help me understand what is street photography. This is when I found this website, iN-PUBLiC.com. It calls itself a home for street photographers and rightly so. Though not boasting the likes of Cartier-Bresson or Winogrand among their authors, the site’s portfolio features some acclaimed street photographers of modern times, like Matt Stuart, David Gibson or Gus Powell.

I have to say that discovery of this resource shaped my view of street photography and gave the direction to follow. If you haven’t heard of this website before, please visit it and you won’t regret.

 

Now, when I’m living far from the maddening crowd of the city, I’m struggling with my new demon: what do I shoot here? As I’ve said before I continue using film cameras, but without this street atmosphere, I find it hard to see anything worth shooting with them. The rhythm of life here is so different that I didn’t make a single photo after an hour of walking around the nearest town. So, again, what I needed was an inspiration.

 

#35mm #superia400

A photo posted by Scott (@tsbehr) on Jun 20, 2016 at 3:04pm PDT

 

Fortunately, I’ve come across this  Instagram account of a person who lives in a place very similar to mine, and he uses film cameras to picture the life around. I’m not into landscape photography, which would seem only logical when you live in a secluded area, but as it turns out shot with expired film nature photos can look at least interesting. And of course those sunny lit bits of rural life, constructions and seemingly deserted places touch some strings in my soul, and I feel this new kind of street photography might be the way to go.

We’ll see.